Sunday Morning Coffee

sunday-morning-coffee

After I gifted a friend a bag of this purely for the name, I had to try it out myself. A little lighter than what I’m used to, but I’m enjoying it. Kicking Horse makes some great coffee.

Now, I’ve got months and months worth of good reads saved up so I hope you’re ready 😁

Things I’m Enjoying:

  • When Grief Becomes Surreal: On the reality-bending effects of trauma in literature
  • This piece by Rosa Lyster about her father rediscovering fiction.
  • How Georgia O’Keeffe left her cheating husband for a mountain
  • You’ve Got Mail and the Internet of Ordinary People by Andrea Laurion

    I wanted to be Kathleen Kelly, her name crisp with that double-kay sound. She was a cool adult, one of the first fictional characters to give me an idea of the kind of life I’d like to lead. Asking a child what she wants to be when she grows up is a question that always pertains to occupation. Though being a bookstore owner was extremely appealing, it was more than the job. With Kathleen, it was about how she lived her life, how she looked at the world around her. Kathleen bought flowers just because. She wore black in the fall and pastels in the spring. Better yet, she was human, not an impossibly perfect idealized person. She said the wrong things and agonized over it for hours, just like I did. We both loved books and the Internet, a contradiction of analog and technology. And like Kathleen Kelly, I tried to hide my online obsession. It felt embarrassing, as if it was a sign that I didn’t know how to act like a human, which, considering I was an awkward preteen, I kind of didn’t.

  • Fried green tomatoes over basil goat cheese grits
  • How Annie Proulx researches

    My earliest memory in life is sunlight patterns on the ground coming down through the leaves of the tree. I remember that before anything else. That sort of sunk into me very early on. And my mother had a question she used to ask from time to time, sometimes when a piece of music was playing on the radio. Classical music usually prompted this question. She would ask, “What do you see when you hear this music?” And I always saw the woods.

  • Jackie Wolven on personal development
  • What lies beneath: an introvert’s guide to fiction–and life

Sunday Morning Coffee

sunday-morning-coffee

I started this post a few weeks ago, when it was Sunday and I had been home for 36 hours, drinking my first cup of coffee in about a month. I was still working on it the following Monday after a thunderstorm blew through overnight. My garden was dripping and my dog was snoring, the kind of start I like to a day. It’s a few weeks later now. I am listening to an audio book, finishing up this list, and enjoying a cup of Kicking Horse Grizzly Claw in one of my new Highland stoneware mugs. Still processing my trip and kind of resigned to the fact that it will be memoir/personal essay material and probably not something I’ll write a lot about here. Thinking about doing a series of posts that are nothing but photos.

Things I’m Enjoying:

  • Road Tripping While Female: “When I was planning a 16-day, 5,000-mile motorcycle road trip across the country in the company of my friend Emily, the first ever what-the-hell trip for either of us, friends and family expressed deep concern. One male friend asked if we were “packing heat,” with the obvious implication that we were asking for trouble. The idea of two women on the road seemed to alarm just about everyone.”
  • Roads & Kingdoms is one of my new favorite things. Travel and food, I love it.
  • In Praise of the ‘Great British Baking Show’ — I don’t understand why the name was changed for American viewers on Netflix. We know what a bake off is over here. I love this show though. That ice cream cake moment…you know what I’m talking about if you’ve seen it.
  • George R. R. Martin’s original plan for the A Song of Ice and Fire series, as shared by him with his publisher, Harper Collins, before the first book.
  • You Should Care About My Life: “Of course there are limits to the power of the first-person pronoun, but sometimes I is not just trivial, it’s essential. When we dismiss confessional writing, we are really asking to be unburdened by another’s request for empathy. Not engaging with a writer’s autobiographical identity might make readers more comfortable, but it doesn’t make for more worthwhile critical discourse.”
  • Bringing back forgotten women writers.
  • Harper Books hosted a writing workshop with Simon Van Booy.
  • Edited to add SCOTT WARS 😍